Casey (I don't know him personally, but after watching his vlog for so long I feel like I should refer to him by his first name) shared his first vlog on his birthday in March 2015, and consistently posted a video *every single day* until just before he ended the vlog. After he completed a year of vlogging this in March 2016, Casey made a subtle change to the title cards he overlays in the beginning of each video. 

What used to read "Casey Neistat Vlog 125" (or whatever number it was) is now "Casey Neistat Episode Twenty Two" (or whatever number it is). It's seems like a nitpick, and it is, but here's why it's important: Casey Neistat created his own reality show.

Episode 22, "a YACHT for his 18th BIRTHDAY" is a great example of what a great episode of the Casey Neistat show. I'm not going to try to retell what happens in the vlog here, so do yourself a favor and take ten minutes to watch it (this essay will more sense if you've seen other episodes too, but episode 22 is a good example to show where I'm going with this). The short version of makes this episode great is something that Casey has been preaching for a long time: it's all about the story.

Good stories bind us together.

Stories are the foundation of our cultures, the building blocks of tradition and philosophy. Imagery and symbolism — latent or not — can transcend any boundary. Language doesn't matter so long as there is an image to bind the story together. Powerful images aren't the only way to do this; music can do accomplish the same thing.

The hardest part of storytelling is finding an audience

But with the rise of the Internet, suddenly finding an audience isn't all that hard. There are caveats, of course. Just because you make YouTube videos doesn't mean you'll become internet famous. But if you really love what you're doing and keep practicing, some day you might become MKBHD, aka Marques Brownlee.

Marques (another YouTuber who I've spent so much time watching I can refer to him by his first name, plus he's has been making YouTube videos for years. They're all on his channel still(tktktktk MKBHD) — take a few minutes to scroll back and you'll see that he's been making videos for years. Now he's got nearly three and a half million subscribers. When MKBHD first started, Marques was making videos about free software and operating system themes. Now he (presumably) gets sent smartphones during embargo periods just like the biggest tech review sites, and he's even partnering with those review sites to do ... stuff.

But grinding your way to the top isn't the only way to find an audience. You can hack the market like GaryVee(channel link), or even cleverly and creatively borrow someone else's audience(how to do Casey vlog) like Sarah Deitchy (rhymes with Peachy).

Sometimes you already have an audience paying attention to one thing you do, but you want those people to focus somewhere else(pick up bikini bottom and push it somewhere else). Well, telling a good story — and offering that audience more of that story — is a great way to move attention from one place to another, which is what my friend (that was his vlog I linked to up there) Sam Sheffer is doing.

Sam was one of the early movers on Twitter and Snapchat. Sam (who I have known for years and can definitely refer to by first name) single-handedly launched The Verge's Snapchat two years ago, and has been a major force on Twitter for as long as I've been on Twitter (so at least since 2009). If that wasn't enough, the dude also is on the forefront of live broadcasting on Periscope. Sam wanted to start a YouTube channel (because he doesn't make enough content as it is) and is pushing 5,000 subscribers after posting less than 40 videos. How? Because he involves his audiences that live on Periscope, Twitter, and Snapchat.

The moral of this story inside a story is that how you tell your story is just as important as what the story is about and, more importantly, why you're telling it. Say that three times fast.

But why are we telling stories in the first place? And what are they supposed to be about?

What a story is about doesn't matter. Again, what's more important is why you're telling it. The only what that matters is what the story means to you.

This is where Casey sets himself apart. Casey Neistat videos — and this goes back before his vlogs — always have a central storyline that clearly matter to Casey Neistat. He cares about his stories, he cares about what it is he is telling his audience. That's why he has an audience in the first place, especially in a place like YouTube where viewers have apex level bullshit detectors. YouTube viewers can smell bullshit from ten clicks away. They can call bullshit after ten seconds of watching a video, or sometimes even from just the thumbnail. Casey doesn't bullshit his audience and they respect him for it.

But finely-tuned bullshit sensors aren't unique to YouTube viewers, it's just that YouTube the platform makes it really easy to spot the bullshitters if you know what to look for(Tai bullshit sponsored shit). If you know the rules well enough it's easy to tell when someone is cheating — just ask a teacher. (On the flip side, if you know the rules better than everyone else it can be pretty easy to cheat)

If your story is important to you, your audience, however small, will recognize and respect you for it.

But how do I tell a good story?

Anyone can tell a good story so long as you're telling a story that matters. Sometimes you'll even find a story that matters to everyone, but usually those are sad stories (see cable news).

Casey has an insane set of camera gear. He uses a top of the line DSLR and lens with best-in-class autofocus. He has an intense tripod to carry and mount his camera rig wherever. He even has a freakin' drone that can take 4K video while it flies itself. But time and time again he reminds his audience that the gear doesn't matter. "The gear doesn't make the story," the story makes the story.

So tell a story that truly, genuinely means something to you. A story that excites you, that gives your bones tingle. A story that puts butterflies in your stomach. A story that makes you want to throw your guts up. A story that makes you happy. And if you keep at it, the audience will come. It doens't matter how you tell it, all that matters is that you tell it in the first place. It doens't even matter if anyone reads or watches or shares your story. All that matters is that the story means something to you.

Anyone can tell a story.

Anyone can tell a story.

Good stories bind us together.

Stories are the foundation of our cultures, the building blocks of tradition and philosophy. Imagery and symbolism — latent or not — can transcend any boundary. Language doesn't matter so long as there is an image to bind the story together. Powerful images aren't the only way to do this, music and rhythm amplify and can acc

The hardest part of storytelling is finding an audience

But with the rise of the Internet, suddenly finding an audience isn't all that hard. There are caveats, of course. Just because you make YouTube videos doesn't mean you'll become internet famous. Sometimes you already have an audience paying attention to one thing you do, but you want those people to focus somewhere else(pick up bikini bottom and push it somewhere else). Well, telling a good story — and offering that audience more of that story — is a great way to move attention from one place to another, which is what my friend (that was his vlog I linked to up there) Sam Sheffer is doing.

Sam was one of the early movers on Twitter and Snapchat. Sam (who I have known for years and can definitely refer to by first name) single-handedly launched The Verge's Snapchat two years ago, and has been a major force on Twitter for as long as I've been on Twitter (so at least since 2009). If that wasn't enough, the dude also is on the forefront of live broadcasting on Periscope. Sam wanted to start a YouTube channel (because he doesn't make enough content as it is) and is pushing 5,000 subscribers after posting less than 40 videos. How? Because he involves his audiences that live on Periscope, Twitter, and Snapchat.

If you really love what you're doing and keep practicing, some day you might become MKBHD, aka Marques Brownlee.

Marques (another YouTuber who I've spent so much time watching I can refer to him by his first name, plus he's friends with my friends so I'll meet him eventually) has been making YouTube videos for years. They're all on his channel still(tktktktk MKBHD) — take a few minutes to scroll back and you'll see that he's been making videos for years. Now he's got nearly three and a half million subscribers. When MKBHD first started, Marques was making videos about free software and operating system themes. Now he (presumably) gets sent smartphones during embargo periods just like the biggest tech review sites, and he's even partnering with those review sites to do ... stuff.

But grinding your way to the top isn't the only way to find an audience. You can hack the market like GaryVee(channel link), or even cleverly and creatively borrow someone else's audience(how to do Casey vlog) like Sarah Deitchy (rhymes with Peachy).

The moral of this story inside a story is that how you tell your story is just as important as what the story is about and, more importantly, why you're telling it. Say that three times fast.

What used to read "Casey Neistat Vlog 125" (or whatever number it was) is now "Casey Neistat Episode Twenty Two" (or whatever number it is). It's seems like a silly thing to talk about, but here's why it's important: Casey Neistat has created his own show.

Casey (I don't know him personally, but after watching his vlog for so long I feel like I should refer to him by his first name) has been doing a daily vlog for a little over a year now. He started on his birthday back in March 2015, and (as far as I'm aware - I'm sure someone from the YouTube comments might correct me on this) he's posted a video every single day since then. After he completed a year of vlogging this past March (that's 2016, if you're counting), Casey made a subtle change to the title cards he overlays in the beginning of each video.

Today's episode is a great example of what a great episode of the Casey Neistat show. I'm not going to try to retell what happens in the vlog here, so do yourself a favor and take ten minutes to watch it (this essay will more sense if you've seen other episodes too, but episode 22 is a good example to show where I'm going with this). The short version of makes this episode great is something that Casey has been preaching for a long time: it's all about the story.

Today's episode was a perfect example of what sets Casey Neistat apart from other YouTubers.

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How do I tell a good story?

Anyone can tell a good story so long as you're telling a story that matters. Sometimes you'll even find a story that matters to everyone, but usually those are sad stories (see cable news).

Casey Neistat has an insane set of camera gear. He uses a top of the line DSLR and lens with best-in-class autofocus. He has an intense tripod to carry and mount his camera rig wherever. He even has a freakin' drone that can take 4K video while it flies itself. But time and time again he reminds his audience that the gear doesn't matter. "The gear doesn't make the story," the story makes the story.

So tell a story that truly, genuinely means something to you. A story that excites you, that gives your bones tingle. A story that puts butterflies in your stomach. A story that makes you want to throw your guts up. A story that makes you happy. And if you keep at it, the audience will come.

But how big your audience is doens't matter. It doesn't't matter how you tell the story, how you publish the story, how you share the story. All that matters is that you tell the story in the first place. It doesn't even matter if anyone reads or watches or shares your it. All that matters is that the story means something to you.

Tell a story and leave your mark on the world.


What used to read "Casey Neistat Vlog 125" (or whatever number it was) is now "Casey Neistat Episode Twenty Two" (or whatever number it is). It's seems like a nitpick, and it is, but here's why it's important: Casey Neistat created his own reality show.

[Episode 22, "a YACHT for his 18th BIRTHDAY"][0] is a great example of what a great episode of the Casey Neistat show. I'm not going to try to retell what happens in the vlog here, so do yourself a favor and take ten minutes to watch it (this essay will more sense if you've seen other episodes too, but episode 22 is a good example to show where I'm going with this). The short version of makes this episode great is something that Casey has been preaching for a long time: it's all about the story. 

 
 

## Good stories bind us together.

Stories are the foundation of our cultures, the building blocks of tradition and philosophy. Imagery and symbolism — latent or not — can transcend any boundary. Language doesn't matter so long as there is an image to bind the story together. Powerful images aren't the only way to do this; music can do accomplish the same thing.

But with the rise of the Internet, suddenly finding an audience isn't all that hard. There are caveats, of course. Just because you make YouTube videos doesn't mean you'll become internet famous. But if you really love what you're doing and keep practicing, some day you might become MKBHD, aka Marques Brownlee. 

Marques (another YouTuber who I've spent so much time watching I can refer to him by his first name, plus he's has been making YouTube videos for years. They're all on his channel still(tktktktk MKBHD) — take a few minutes to scroll back and you'll see that he's been making videos for _years_. Now he's got nearly three and a half million subscribers. When MKBHD first started, Marques was making videos about free software and operating system themes. Now he (presumably) gets sent smartphones during embargo periods just like the biggest tech review sites, and he's even _partnering_ with those review sites to do ... [stuff][1]. 

 

But grinding your way to the top isn't the only way to find an audience. You can hack the market like GaryVee(channel link), or even cleverly and creatively borrow someone else's audience(how to do Casey vlog) like Sarah Deitchy (rhymes with Peachy).